Experiential Education Archives

University of Auckland-Business Masters-MikesBikes Advanced- Presenations

University of Auckland Business Masters’ MikesBikes Presentations

The Business Masters students taught by Professor Darl Kolb from the University of Auckland were suited and booted for their final presentations on the MikesBikes Advanced Strategic Management Simulation

“The MikesBikes simulation combines elements of strategy, marketing, operations, product design and human resource management within a complex competitive environment. Besides the business and management aspects, the simulation provides a place for leadership to emerge as it did in these successful teams. I am always proud of all our simulation teams, but seeing so many of our students do so well on the world stage makes me immensely proud.”

– Professor Darl Kolb

Check out some of the photos from the final presentation:

Photos are taken from The University of Auckland Business School

First Place in NJIT SOM

2018 Strategic Management Showcase at New Jersey Institute of Technology

You can’t look at the competition and say you’re going to do it better. You have to look at the competition and say you’re going to do it differently.

-Steve Jobs

Students from New Jersey Institute of Technology definitely did things differently which led them to succeed in the The Fourth Annual Strategic Management Showcase with MikesBikes Advanced! The Showcase concluded last 30th of November with great success!

The Top 6 teams across the Strategic Management course competed head-to-head to achieve the highest Shareholder Value in MikesBikes Advanced.

The winning team, ALY BikeZ consisted of Aditya Patel, Luke Gregory and Yandy Gonzalez-Acevedo.

In second place we have CycloTherapy with Dikasse Zalla, Rosa Lee Moss and William Penn.

In third place we have CTS Bikes with Christopher Kukla, Spencer Kapp and Thomas Brady.

Congratulations to ALY BIkeZ and to all the participants! Well done and we wish you all the best!

Check out some of the photos from the Showcase:

Photos are provided by Shanthi Gopalakrishnan. 

Sunil Abinandan's Smartsims Journey from student to employee

Student Success Stories: Journey from a MikesBikes Business Simulation Student to a Smartsims Employee

Get to know the latest addition to the Smartsims Team, Sunil Abinandan. He shares his experiences doing the MikesBikes Advanced simulation as a student, mentor and how these successfully helped him land the job here at Smartsims!  Continue reading Student Success Stories: Journey from a MikesBikes Business Simulation Student to a Smartsims Employee

AdSim Marketing Plan Budget Report

ADSIM ADVERTISING SIMULATION REPORT GUIDE: Marketing Plan Budget Report

What is the Marketing Plan Budget Report?

The forecast marketing expenditure budget shows you how much money you have available to spend this year as shown in the figure below.

Note: This report can be found in the Marketing Plan menu.

Forecast Project Budget Expenditure AdSim

There are three key parts of this report that you must understand.

Budget Limit

Your budget limit is set as part of your product’s marketing plan. It is up to you to decide whether you spend your entire budget or not.

How much you spend of this year’s budget has no effect on your budget for next year.

Budget Expenditure

The first column shows much money you currently have allocated to evaluation research, Agency fees and product advertising. Changing any of your decisions in these areas will automatically update this report.

Available to Spend

This is how much unallocated budget you have left, i.e. how much money you still have available to spend if you want to. Any money you spend will be deducted from your net marketing contribution, so you should only spend on activities where you think the return will more than cover the cost.

If this number is negative that means that you have exceeded your budget and you need to choose which advertising activities to cut back. If you do not do so yourself, then AdSim will automatically reduce your media advertising expenditure during the rollover to bring you back within budget.

Check out the latest AdSim Report Guide here:

Industry Benchmark Report

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AdSim Advertising Simulation by Smartsims Industry Benchmark Report

AdSim Advertising Simulation Report Guide: Industry Benchmark Report

What is the Industry Benchmark Report?

The Industry Benchmark Report is a summary of all firms’ Net Marketing Contribution reports so that you can benchmark yourself against your competitors as shown in the figure below.

In real life, this information would be difficult to obtain, but this report has been made available to you so that you can learn from your competitor(s).

There are several key parts of this report that you need to understand.

Sales & Gross Margin

Sales and Gross Margin in AdSim Advertising simulation

The Sales Revenue listed for each is the total wholesale sales revenue of all the firm’s products. The Cost of Goods Sold is the total cost of goods sold of all of the firm’s products that were sold, which is the number of units of a particular product sold multiplied by its manufacturing cost.

Gross Margin is the amount of profit that each firm made after the manufacturing costs were deducted.

You have no control over either the wholesale price or the manufacturing cost of your product, so your aim to maximize sales revenue by running the most cost effective advertising campaign that you can.

Product Marketing

Product Marketing in AdSim Advertising simulation

This section shows the combined Market Research, Agency Fees, Media Advertising, Customer Relationship and Marketing Communications expenditure for each firm.

The Evaluation Research expenditure lets you know how much market research your competitors are purchasing.

The Agency Fees let you know whether your competitors are using an Agency or not and how much it is costing them.

The Media Advertising expenditure allows you to see how much money your competitors are spending on Advertising, but now how they are allocating it to each media type.

Customer Relationship and Marketing Communications expenditure lets you know how much your competitors spent on implementing their selected options.

Net Marketing Contribution

Net Marketing Contribution in AdSim Advertising simulation

Net Marketing Contribution is the amount of profit remaining after manufacturing (cost of goods sold) and marketing expenditures have been deducted. The only costs still to be deducted are other functional overhead costs for your firm, e.g. finance, administration, etc.

Net Marketing Contribution is a measure of how profitable your firm is as a result of its strategic marketing plan. There is only one way that you can improve it, increase your Sales Revenue per dollar of Marketing Expenditure.

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MikesBikes Intro Report Guide - Industry Benchmark Report

MikesBikes Introduction Report Guide: Industry Benchmark Report

What is the Industry Benchmark Report?

This report is a summary of all firms’ Key Financial results, which you can use to benchmark yourself against your competitors.

In MikesBikes Introduction, this report is divided into four sections: Financial Results, Customer Satisfaction, Internal Results and Innovation Learning.

Financial Results

MikesBikes Intro Financial Results

There are two key variables that you need to understand in this section, Share Price and Shareholder Value.

Your Share Price is the current market price of one share in your firm; the main drivers of share price are your average earnings per share (EPS) and your D/E ratio. If you want to improve your Share Price then you need to keep improving your EPS and to keep your D/E ratio below 1.0.

Shareholder Value is a measure of how much value a shareholder has received from owning one share of your company from the moment you took over running your firm. So Shareholder value is the current Share Price, plus the accumulated dividends that you have paid with 10% compound interest.

Customer Satisfaction

Customer Satisfaction in MikesBikes Intro Most of the fields here should be self-explanatory. However, you need to be aware that the Distribution Channel support figures include both your Extra Support (sales promotion support) spending and the annual support cost of supporting all the retailers that currently stock your products. Distribution Information (Distribution and Branding > Reports tab) report details what those annual costs are.

So every firm that has at least one store stocking its products will be spending at least a couple of hundred dollars. To see what their sales promotion budgets are, view the Multi-Firm Retailer Margins and Extra Support report under “Firm Marketing”.

Internal Results

Internal Results in Mikesbikes intro

The main purpose of this section of the report is so that you can compare your production efficiency strategy with your competitors. Make sure to compare your wastage results and number of products. The lower the production efficiency budget and the higher the number of products (more setup time), then the worse a firm’s wastage value will be.

Innovation and Learning

Innovation and Learning in Mikesbikes intro

Monitor how much your competitor(s) are spending on product development, it means that they are either making their products cheaper to produce, more attractive to the market or both. If you let a competitor get a significant production cost advantage over you then they will easily win any price wars involving that product.

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Check out the Smartsims Support Center or contact us here.

Music2Go Marketing Factory

Question of the Week: Why did I receive a different number of units from what I ordered? | Music2Go Marketing Business Simulation

In Music2Go you make decisions for an entire year, but your factory has a limited ability to adjust the number of units produced to try to meet actual demand during the year. This is called Demand Responsiveness.

Demand Responsiveness allows the actual number of units ordered to increase or decrease by up to 20% to meet the actual demand for your product.

For instance, if you ordered 1 million units of a product, then the actual number of units delivered could vary between 800,000 units and 1.2 million units depending on actual demand.

Product Contribution Report in Music2Go Marketing

In our example above, we ordered 1.9 million units of our Sonic product, but the Actual Units ordered was less than this at 1.5 million because the demand for our products was less than what we anticipated to sell.

Note: Most worlds have 20% Demand Responsiveness enabled, although your instructor may request this to be modified or disabled for your Multi-Player. 

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Music2Go Sales Promotion Screen

Question of the Week: What is Sales Promotion? | Music2Go Marketing Simulation

Sales Promotion

Sales Promotion in Music2Go works by boosting your distribution coverage and distribution index. You should buy the Distribution Coverage and Sales Promotion Market Research report for detailed information on the Sales Promotion Rating and stage of Product Life Cycle for all firms in the Industry.

There are 6 types of sales promotion activities available to you to promote your
products and support your distributors:

  • Trade Shows
  • Salesforce Training
  • Premiums (Gifts)
  • Website / Social Media
  • Point of Purchase displays
  • Rebates

Each promotional activity has particular relevance to certain stages of the Product Life Cycle as outlined below. Note that the Distribution Coverage and Sales Promotion Market Research report will show the age and stage of product life cycle for every product on the market, as well as the Sales Promotion Rating and the Promotion Mix effectiveness.

Choosing a Sales Promotion Mix

Sales Promotion Mix in Music2Go Marketing

Remember that each of your products will progress through the Product Life Cycle starting in the Growth phase for new products, then gradually progressing through to the Decline stage over the next six rollovers.

Say we launch a new Sports product this period. This new product will start in the Growth phase of the Product Life Cycle. Then from looking at the Sales Promotion table (this can be found in the Player’s Manual and Market Information Report), we can see that our ideal Sales Promotion Mix for a new Sports product is:

  • Trade Shows: 20%
  • Sales Force Training: 30%
  • Premiums (Gifts): 20%
  • Website and Social Media: 15%
  • Point of Purchase Displays: 15%
  • Rebates: 0%

Total =100%

That was a simple example, but what happens in the second year that we sell this Sports product? The product will have moved from the “Growth” phase to “Growth – Starting to Mature.” So the optimal Sales Promotion mix will be 1/3 of the way between the ideal Growth and Mature in the Sales Promotion table. That would give us an optimal Sales Promotion mix something like:

  • Trade Shows: 15%

(Ideal Growth = 20%, Ideal Mature = 5%)

  • Sales Force Training: 27%

(Ideal Growth = 30%, Ideal Mature = 20%)

  • Premiums (Gifts): 26%

(Ideal Growth = 20%, Ideal Mature = 40%)

  • Website and Social Media: 13%

(Ideal Growth = 15%, Ideal Mature = 10%)

  • Point of Purchase Displays: 17%

(Ideal Growth =15%, Ideal Mature =20%)

  • Rebates: 2%

(Ideal Growth = 0%, Ideal Mature = 5%)

Total =100%

Tip: You should buy the Distribution Coverage and Sales Promotion Market Research
report for detailed information on the Sales Promotion Rating and stage of Product
Life Cycle for all firms in the Industry.

Related Articles
Chossing an agency in AdSim

Question of the Week: Which Agency should I choose in AdSim Advertising Simulation?

Agency Selection

The first key decision you need to make for each of your products is whether you will employ the services of an advertising agency to assist you with your media selection.

Four Agencies

Agency selection screen in AdSim

Internal Plan

The Internal Plan means trusting your own media selection ability and going at it alone, which often obtains far greater returns.

The default plan for each product is average at best. Approximately 30% of you promotion budget is being wasted on poor media selection. By carefully reading and analyzing the marketing plan and market overview/research for your product’s target segment, you should be able to greatly improve the effectiveness of your promotion budget.

TV Magic

TV Magic is a media-buying agency that specializes in producing TV advertisements and bulk purchasing TV advertising time.

TV Magic will suggest a TV advertising media plan that will be significantly better than following the default plan. They are less skilled at other media production/selection, but their suggested plans will be noticeably better than the default plan.

Print Works

Print Works is a media buying agency that specializes in producing print advertisements and bulk purchasing print advertising space.

Print Works will suggest a Newspaper/Magazine advertising media plan that will be significantly better than following the default plan. They are less skilled at other media production/selection, but their suggested plans will still be noticeably better than the default plan.

Radio Can

Radio Can is a media-buying agency that specializes in producing radio advertisements and bulk purchasing radio-advertising airtime.

Radio Can will suggest a radio advertising media plan that will be at least significantly better than following the fault plan. They are less skilled at other media production/selection, but their suggested plans will still be noticeably better than the default plan.

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  • Alternatively, you can contact our Support Team here.

Best Practice in Experiential Learning by Frank Voehl

While all industries have best practices, they are especially prevalent in IT given that so much of the business revolves around data and business processes. Best practices formally represent tested and proven techniques in the form of procedural documentation. In contrast, undocumented procedures are often misleading because stated parameters are not necessarily true or accurate.

Best Practice

Definition – What does Best Practice mean? 

A best practice is an industry-wide agreement that standardizes the most efficient way to accomplish a desired outcome. A best practice generally consists of a technique, method or process. The concept implies that if an organization follows best practices, a delivered outcome with minimal problems or complications will be ensured. Best practices are often used for benchmarking and represent an outcome of repeated and contextual user actions.

Abstract

Experiential learning is the basic process of learning through experience and is more specifically defined as learning through reflection on doing. It is akin to forms of Hands-on Learning but does not necessarily involve participants reflecting on the outcomes or products of the process. Experiential learning is distinct from traditional forms of rote or didactic learning, in which the learner plays a comparatively passive role. It is related to, but not synonymous with, other forms of action learning and free-choice learning, along with cooperative learning.[1]

Assessing the effectiveness of the training program in terms of the benefits to the trainees and the company is a crucial element of any experiential learning program. Most assessments are data driven, and traditional tools use tests to measure effectiveness. When it comes to experiential learning programs, it is extremely difficult to gather data that can be used for assessments. This is where analytics come in. When combined with simulations and gamification, experiential training products become a powerhouse of data that can be used to deliver assessments results accurately across cognitive learning, skills affect and objective results.

The analytics engines in these simulations (such as MikesBikes) record, analyze and provide a detailed report on the participants’ interaction throughout the simulation. For writing purposes, I have chosen to use the classic Journalism tool called the 5Ws and One H method, starting with What, followed by Why, When, Where, Who — and lastly — How.[2]

What is Experiential Learning

In the words of Lewis and Williams: “In its simplest form, experiential learning means learning from experience or learning by doing. Experiential education first immerses learners in an experience and then encourages reflection about the experience to develop new skills, new attitudes, or new ways of thinking.”[3] The first theories of experiential learning arose in the mid-nineteenth century as attempts to move away from traditional formal education, where teachers simply presented students with abstract concepts, and toward an immersive method of instruction. Students would “learn by doing,” applying knowledge to experience to develop skills or new ways of thinking.

Experiential learning is also built upon a foundation of interdisciplinary and constructivist learning. Experiential methodology doesn’t treat each subject as being walled off in its own room, unconnected to any other subjects. Compartmentalized learning doesn’t reflect the real world, while as the experiential classroom works to create an interdisciplinary learning experience that mimics real world learning.

Similarly, experiential learning is aligned with the constructivist theory of learning in that the outcomes of the learning process are varied and often unpredictable and learners play a critical role in assessing their own learning.  How one participant chooses to solve a problem will be different from another, and what one takes away from an experience will be different from the others.

The context for learning is different—learning may not take place in the classroom, and there may be no textbooks or academic texts to study. Finally, the curriculum itself may not be clearly identified—the student may have to identify the knowledge required and then acquire it themselves, reflecting on their learning as they go along.

Experiential learning can also be defined by the qualities it imparts on its learners. Successful experiential learners have a willingness to reorder or alter their conception of a topic. They can reason for themselves and are able to successfully explain their position. They have clarity of purpose with tasks they undertake and the self-management skills necessary to work successfully both alone and in a group.

Experiential learners are aware of the “rules” governing their discipline or mode of operation, but are also open-minded, and able to work with people with different views. Finally, experiential learners are in control of their voice—they can identify the role of emotion in their learning, as well as reflect on how they have come to their new knowledge (Moon, 2004, p. 163).[4]

Why Use Experiential Learning

The open nature of experiential learning means that it can often be difficult to define what is, and is not, an experiential activity. There are many activities that have the potential to be experiential but may not be depending on the execution.

As outlined by Chapman, McPhee, and Proudman:

“Simple participation in a prescribed set of learning experiences does not make something experiential. The experiential methodology is not linear, cyclical, or even patterned. It is a series of working principles, all of which are equally important or must be present to varying degrees at some time during experiential learning. These principles are required no matter what activity the student is engaged in or where the learning takes place” (1995, p. 243).[5]

To define ‘why,’ the following list of characteristics can be used to define the purpose of an activity or method as experiential, including [6]:

  1. Mixture of content and process: There must be a balance between the experiential activities and the underlying content or theory.
  2. Absence of excessive judgment: The instructor must create a safe space for students to work through their own process of self-discovery.
  3. Engagement in purposeful endeavors: In experiential learning, the learner is the self-teacher, therefore there must be “meaning for the student in the learning.”
  4. Relevance: The learning activities must be personally relevant to the student. Prepared by Michelle Schwartz, Research Associate, for the Vice Provost, Academic, Ryerson University, 2012
  5. Encouraging the big picture perspective: Experiential activities must allow the students to make connections between the learning they are doing and the world. Activities should build in students the ability to perceive and understand the relationships in complex systems, and then find a way to work within them.
  6. The role of reflection: Students should be able to reflect on their own learning, bringing “the theory to life” and gaining insight into themselves and their interactions with the world.
  7. Creating an emotional investment: Learners must be fully immersed in the experience, not merely doing what they feel is required of them. The process needs to engage the learner to a point where what is being learned and experienced strikes a critical, central sweet-spot within the learner.
  8. The re-examination of values: By working within a space that has been made safe for self exploration, students can begin to analyze and even alter their own values.
  9. The presence of meaningful relationships: One part of getting students to see their learning in the context of the whole world is to start by showing the relationships between “learner to self, learner to teacher, and learner to learning environment.”
  10. Learning outside one’s perceived comfort zones: “Learning is enhanced when students are given the opportunity to operate outside of their own perceived comfort zones.” This doesn’t refer just to physical environment, but also to the social environment. This could include, for instance, “being accountable for one’s actions and owning the consequences.”
When and Where: Methods for Assessing Experiential Activities

One of the keys to experiential learning is personalized learning. To enable personalized learning, every program needs to enable a journey through the following phases: Assessment, teaching and learning strategy, and curriculum choice. Experiential learning methodology is highly effective in meeting these requirements to enable personalized learning. It is a radical departure from traditional learning methods and takes the learning beyond the classroom, as the participants set their own learning pace. By combining technology and simulations with experiential learning, companies are making this concept available anytime and anywhere, across multiple devices.  This has introduced the concepts of the ‘flipped classroom,’ where the learning goes to the students and not the other way.[7]

Although there are potentially a wide variety of ways to assess when to use experiential activities, the most productive include both external and internal factors. Although all these methods are tied to reflection, the key is helping learners by focusing their learning while also producing an outcome/ product for assessment purposes.

Moon lists 20 or more examples in the Handbook of Reflective and Experiential Learning[8], of which items # 1, 3, 10, 13 and 15 have traditionally been selected as the most effective and popular:

  1. Maintenance of a learning journal or a portfolio
  2. Reflection on critical incidents
  3. Presentation on what has been learnt
  4. Analysis of strengths and weaknesses and related action planning
  5. Essay or report on what has been learnt (preferably with references to excerpts from reflective writing)
  6. Self-awareness tools and exercises (e.g. questionnaires about learning patterns)
  7. A review of a book that relates the work experience to own discipline
  8. Short answer questions of a ‘why’ or ‘explain’ nature
  9. A project that develops ideas further (group or individual)
  10. Self-evaluation of a task performed
  11. An article (e.g. for a newspaper) explaining something in the workplace
  12. Recommendation for improvement of some practice (a sensitive matter)
  13. An interview of the learner as a potential worker in the workplace
  14. A story that involves thinking about experiencing learning
  15. A request that students take a given theory and observe its application in the workplace
  16. An oral exam
  17. Management of an informed discussion
  18. A report on an event in the work situation (ethical issues)
  19. Account of how discipline issues apply to the workplace [9]
  20. An identification of and rationale for projects that could be done in the workplace.
Who Uses Experiential Learning

Instructors and participants like to use experiential learning for simulations. Simulations use real life scenarios that depict several challenges that a participant will eventually face after the course completion. It is only natural that mistakes happen during learning; using simulations is like taking kids to a playground, and getting them to have fun, try new things and learn in a safe controlled environment. By moving beyond theory to the realm of “learning by doing,’ the learner gets a first-hand experience of practicing what has been taught.  This plays a crucial role in retaining concepts and ideas.

How to Use the Learning Portfolio

There are very few learning methods that can have a dramatic impact on the participant’s mindset. Experiential Learning is one of them. Management guru Henry Mintzberg pointed out long ago that leadership, like swimming, cannot be learned by reading about it. The high focus on collaboration and learning from each other benefits the participant as it increases engagement. On the other hand, since the participant is immediately involved in the problem-solving activity or event, the level of ownership of the outcome is high.

Of these methods, Qualters[10] focuses on using the learning portfolio as one of the most comprehensive methods of assessing experiential learning, with its purpose being to “strongly determine the themes of the reflective narrative, as well as the types of documentation or evidence selected in the appendices.” A planning rubric representing this can be a table with three columns—purpose, theme, and evidence—and the content of these columns can be quite broad.  John Zubizarreta[11] proposes a simple model for a learning portfolio with three fundamental and interrelated components:

1. Reflection  2. Documentation  3. Collaboration.

Learning portfolios are distinguished from standard professional portfolios through their inclusion of a reflection component. It therefore becomes more than just “a showcase of student materials,” and instead becomes a “purposefully designed collection connected by carefully thought out structured student reflections.”

To plan a learning portfolio project, Zubizarreta[12] provides a short rubric that asks instructors to first identify the purpose of the portfolio, and then answer the following questions:

  1. What kind of reflective questions should students address?
  2. What kinds of evidence or learning outcomes would be most useful?
  3. How will students engage in collaboration and mentoring during the process?

Beyond assessing student learning, well-constructed portfolios can be used for accreditation, university-wide outcome assessment, and to document and understand the learning process at both the level of course and program.

How to Measure and Assess Experiential Learning

Measurement and assessment are very often the most integral parts of the experiential learning process. It provides a basis for participants and instructors alike to confirm and reflect on the learning and growth that has and is occurring. Further, proper assessment methods engender a “reflective process that ensures continued growth long after specific learning opportunities have been completed.

Without the appropriate assessment tool, such as a self-assessment, the educator might not ever realize that significant learning occurred. Therefore, classroom educators should search for assessment techniques that measure more than just the ability to remember information. [13]. The assessment of experiential activities presents a unique problem to instructors. Because in experiential activities the means are as important as the ends, “it is important to look at assessment as more than outcome measurement.

While outcomes are important to measure, they reflect the product of assessment, not a complete assessment cycle” (Qualters, 2010, p. 56). It is therefore necessary to devise unique assessment methods to measure success in both the process and the product—each area requires separate learning outcomes and criteria (Moon, 2004, p. 155).

Summary

I believe there are eight reasons why experiential learning is very likely to become the future of learning: [14]

  • Accelerates the learning process
  • Provides a relatively safe and secure learning environment
  • Bridges the gap between learning theory and practice
  • Produces demonstrable mindset changes
  • Increases participant engagement levels
  • Delivers exceptional Return on Investment or payback
  • Provides measurable and accurate assessment results
  • Enables personalized learning.

Everybody has one’s own model of learning, some of them more effective than others. In this article, I tried to convince interested readers to become enablers of a powerful learning experience which will help build a learning context by experiencing things. The need is urgent; the time is now.

The question is: Are you ready?


For references and footnotes view the PDF copy here: Best Practices in Experiential Learning by Frank Voehl

Frank Voehl

This article is written by Frank Voehl. Frank is an Innovation Coach and expert in the application of the business improvement tools and innovation methods to public and private organizations, including city, county, community government, and non-profit operations. He is also a Grand Master Black Belt Instructor in Lean Six Sigma and Performance Management. He’s a noted author and series editor of over 30 books and hundreds of business management and improvement articles and technical papers. He also provided input on the original design of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, and facilitated its crossover to other nations and regions, including the Bahamas, South America, Europe and the Czech Republic.